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Bumble IPO filing details $125m cash payment and loan to founder

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Bumble founder Whitney Wolfe Herd received a $125m payout following a complex reorganisation of the dating app’s parent company, according to a regulatory filing ahead of its initial public offering.

Details of Ms Wolfe Herd’s financial arrangements with the company, including a $119m loan to an entity she controlled, are contained in an IPO prospectus published on Friday.

The prospectus also showed that Bumble Holdings, which owns Bumble and the Europe-centric dating app Badoo, swung to a loss and grew at a slower pace following the reorganisation led by the private equity group Blackstone in 2019.

Bumble has touted a focus on the experience of women on its dating apps, tapping into the growing market for online matchmaking services. The company reported 42.1m monthly active users across Badoo and its namesake app at the end of September, of which about 2.4m were paying users.

But the company’s growth has slowed since Blackstone agreed to purchase a majority stake in 2019 and installed Ms Wolfe Herd as chief executive, following allegations of a toxic work environment under former head Andrey Andreev.

Mr Andreev exited the company, previously known as MagicLab, and sold his stake as part of the deal, Blackstone said at the time. The investment valued Bumble’s parent company at about $3bn.

Ms Wolfe Herd received a cash payout of $125m as a result of the Blackstone-led deal, according to the filings. Bumble also loaned $119m to an entity controlled by Ms Wolfe Herd. She settled the remainder of the loan this month.

Corporate governance experts usually warn against such transactions, which can raise questions about conflicts of interest. WeWork drew a backlash for similar related party transactions during its attempted public offering in 2019.

Blackstone, the venture capital group Accel, and Ms Wolfe Herd are expected to maintain voting control over Bumble after the IPO.

In a move that is common for private equity-owned companies, Bumble will also be structured as an umbrella partnership corporation that gives tax benefits to insiders. New shareholders will purchase stock in a holding company, Bumble Inc, with a controlling interest in Bumble Holdings.

The IPO filing comes on the back of a strong market for new US listings, after shares in other consumer tech companies such as Airbnb and DoorDash surged from their IPO prices.

The listing will heighten the rivalry between Bumble and the dominant player in dating apps, Match Group, which owns Tinder, OKCupid and its namesake Match.com. The two companies were recently embroiled in a legal battle over allegations of patent infringement and the stealing of trade secrets, before settling all litigation last year.

Bumble also faces increasing competition in the matchmaking industry as social media group Facebook rolls out its own dating service to its 2.7bn users.

Bumble reported net losses of $117m in the first nine months of last year, a reversal from positive earnings of $69m during the same period in 2019, but a figure that the company said was affected by transaction costs.

Growth slowed last year. In the first nine months of 2020, Bumble reported revenues of $417m, an increase of 14.9 per cent from the same period in 2019, but slower than the 35.8 per cent revenue growth it reported from 2018 to 2019.

Bumble reported 2020 financials in two sections to reflect a change in corporate structure following the completion of the Blackstone-led reorganisation.

The company said it would use IPO proceeds largely to pay down debt and repurchase equity interests from private shareholders. Goldman Sachs and Citigroup are serving as lead underwriters on the offering.



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Pepco and Poundland chains target multibillion valuation in IPO

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South African conglomerate Steinhoff is set to raise up to 4.6bn zlotys ($1bn) when it lists its Pepco chain of discount retailers in Warsaw this month in the latest in a series of asset sales.

Pepco, which operates about 3,200 stores in countries including Poland, Romania and Hungary, as well as Poundland in the UK, said on Wednesday that shares in the offering would be priced between 38 zlotys and 46 zlotys.

In total, Steinhoff and members of Pepco’s management team will sell 102.7m shares or 17.9 per cent of Pepco to the public, valuing the company at between 21.9bn zlotys and 26.5bn zlotys. The final price will be set on May 14, and trading will begin on May 26.

A portion of shares will also be placed directly with some of Steinhoff’s lenders, following an earlier agreement between the conglomerate and its creditors.

Andy Bond, the former Asda chief executive who now runs Pepco, intends to sell more than 1m shares in the IPO, worth roughly €9.7m at the midpoint of the price range, though he will be subject to a lock-up period until the end of 2023 thereafter.

Bond said the company planned to open a further 8,000 stores “over the longer term”, but would also keep “a clear focus on costs and delivering additional efficiencies as we grow”.

Pepco’s listing is likely to be one of the biggest this year on the Warsaw exchange, which has seen a flurry of activity since Poland’s dominant ecommerce platform Allegro raised 9.2bn zlotys last year in the country’s largest initial public offering

Steinhoff will initially retain a stake of about 82 per cent, but the group is looking to sell assets to reduce debt after an accounting scandal in 2017. 

It has already sold Bensons for Beds, another UK retailer, to private equity group Alteri, and has an option to sell a further 15.4m shares in Pepco in the offering if investors show sufficient interest. Goldman Sachs and JPMorgan are advising on the IPO.

Pepco’s business heartland is in central Europe, but the group is planning to expand elsewhere on the continent, such as Spain, and is targeting earnings before interest, tax, depreciation and amortisation of more than €1bn within the next “five to seven years”.

In the year to the end of September, it reported sales of €3.5bn and underlying ebitda of €229m. Ebitda was almost a third lower than in the previous 12 months, as the pandemic forced stores to close across Europe.

Like many other discount retailers, Pepco does not trade online, as the small size of the purchases typically made by its customers makes the economics of ecommerce difficult.

The group said last week that sales had risen 4.4 per cent in the six months to the end of March, thanks to the opening of more than 200 new stores. However, on a like-for-like basis, sales were down 2.1 per cent.



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Honest Company’s market debut marks a comeback

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When the Honest Company lists on the Nasdaq exchange on Wednesday, it will be the culmination of a long recovery for the baby and beauty products group co-founded and fronted by the actress Jessica Alba.

The company priced its initial public offering on Tuesday at a valuation of $1.4bn, having worked to shake off much of the reputational and financial damage from a series of product lawsuits and recalls.

Honest, founded in 2011, had been valued as high as $1.7bn in 2015 before controversy over some of its claims to be using only natural ingredients in its products. In 2017, the company also recalled baby wipes because it found mould in some packages, and baby powder over concerns it may cause skin or eye infections.

Sales slid and Honest lost its status as a “unicorn”, a private company worth more than $1bn.

“Our rapid growth,” Alba wrote in a confessional passage in the IPO prospectus, “was compromising key business functions.”

Honest has never been profitable, but its revenue rose from $236m in 2019 to $300m in 2020 as the pandemic fuelled a run on cleaning products and other household staples. That took sales back to the level the company last enjoyed in 2016.

Losses narrowed last year to $14m from $31m in 2019.

Honest has previously said it expected to price its offering between $14 and $17 a share. At $16 each, it raised $413m, a majority of which will go to existing investors who are selling some of their stake.

Alba had been inspired to launch the brand after the birth of her first child left her scrambling to find household products she deemed safe to use around her daughter. She pledged to hold the company to an “honest standard of safety and transparency”.

Honest markets its products as natural, boasting that “we ban over 2,500 questionable ingredients”. It is one of many consumer goods makers seeking to tap into buyers’ appetite for household products seen as non-synthetic and sustainable.

The company still flags “health and safety incidents or advertising inaccuracies” as a continued risk factor in its prospectus. In January the brand issued a voluntary recall for one of its bubble baths, out of concerns that it could cause infections.

Ahead of the IPO, the company said two weeks ago that Alba would be stepping down as chair of the board when the company lists, handing the role to James White, former chief executive of Jamba Juice. She will remain the company’s chief creative officer, on a salary of $600,000 a year and, according to the prospectus, key to the company’s future success.

“Jessica Alba is a globally recognised Latina business leader, entrepreneur, advocate, actress and New York Times bestselling author,” it said. “Our brand may . . . depend on the positive image and public popularity of Ms Alba to maintain and increase brand recognition.”

Alba’s 6.1 per cent stake after the IPO was worth about $90m at Tuesday’s offer price.

The 3.8 per cent stake held by chief executive Nick Vlahos was valued at $57m. Vlahos has been steering Honest’s recovery since 2017, when he replaced co-founder and serial entrepreneur Brian Lee.

Honest secured a $200m investment from the consumer-focused private equity group L Catterton in 2018. The group is selling about half of its current 37.1 per cent stake in the offering, enough to recoup that investment, leaving a 17.4 per cent holding worth another $252m.

Morgan Stanley, JPMorgan and Jefferies are leading the offering.



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Oxford Nanopore/IPO: sequencer has Woodford in its DNA

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The stampede of pandemic winners to the stock market inspires wariness. Oxford Nanopore, which plans to go public this year, is one such beneficiary. The spinout from Oxford university is responsible for a fifth of the international sequencing that tracked coronavirus mutations.

That has drawn attention to a company with a lot of potential in a wide range of applications. An initial public offering could value it at significantly more than the £2.5bn price tag from a private funding round on Tuesday.

Started in 2005, Oxford Nanopore has benefited from the support of long-term shareholders. However, the backing of Neil Woodford is a complicating factor. The funds business of the prominent UK asset manager folded in 2019 following dire performance.

A successful float would benefit Schroder UK Public Private, the “patient capital” investment trust Woodford formerly ran. But there will be anger from former investors in his defunct income fund. Its 6 per cent stake in Oxford Nanopore was bought by Nasdaq-listed Acacia Research, which put a valuation of just $111m on it in its latest accounts. Woodford, who announced a controversial plan to restart his career in February, is working with Acacia as an adviser.

Oxford Nanopore’s decision to join the London market rather than Nasdaq will also hamper the valuation. But assume, as Jefferies does, that sales more than doubled to £115m in 2020. Even if Oxford Nanopore was valued at half the multiple of peers like US Pacific Biosciences, it would be worth £3.6bn.

That is less than a tenth of the size of San Diego’s Illumina, the global leader. Oxford Nanopore argues its sequencing technology — which monitors changes to an electrical current as nucleic acids are passed through a tiny hole — beats traditional camera-based approaches. Sequencing can be done quickly and cheaply by miniaturised devices. Accuracy has been a weak point, but is improving.

Investors should focus on the science, setting aside market froth and the Woodford connection. At the right price, Oxford Nanopore’s plan to facilitate the analysis of “anything, by anyone, anywhere” would be worth investing in.

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