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Airbnb looks to raise up to $2.5bn in IPO

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Airbnb disclosed on Tuesday that it could raise as much as $2.5bn in its initial public offering, as it moves ahead with plans to list before Christmas, joining a crowded group of newcomers taking advantage of the record high in US stock markets.

The home-rentals business set the price range of its float at between $44 and $50 per share. Airbnb said it would sell as many as 55m shares, including a so-called “greenshoe” option to sell 5m more shares that could yield an additional $250m, taking its total proceeds before costs to $2.75bn. Existing investors will sell roughly 1.9m shares in the IPO.

At the top of the price range, the company would have a market value of $29.8bn, a feat considering its operations were moribund for part of this year after the pandemic and governments travel restrictions cut into its business, causing a collapse of bookings on its platform.

People briefed on the company’s listing process had said Airbnb had aimed for a valuation between $25bn and $30bn. Some investors purchased equity warrants valuing Airbnb at $18bn this year. Airbnb plans to list on the Nasdaq under the symbol ABNB.

The company’s ability to clinch the top-end of its targeted valuation would underline the extent public investors are clamouring for fast growing technology groups. Shares in companies in sectors such as business software and cloud computing have surged to new market highs.

Meanwhile, November has been one of the strongest months on record for US stocks, following double digits monthly gains. Sentiment was boosted by Joe Biden’s win in the US presidential election and Covid-19 vaccine breakthroughs.

Column chart of Quarterly results ($m) showing Airbnb's business has rebounded from the depths of the pandemic

Airbnb will begin its roadshow this week, where it will attempt to convince investors that its business has rebounded from the depths of the coronavirus pandemic and still has room to grow further.

The San Francisco-based accommodation booking service recorded losses of nearly $700m on revenues of $2.5bn in the first nine months this year, widening from losses of $323m in the same period last year. In the second quarter, Airbnb suffered a $576m loss as the travel industry collapsed. However, the company swung to a profit of $219m in the third quarter, as the summer pushed people, and particularly remote workers, to retreat to nearby places outside urban areas.

On Monday, the meal delivery company DoorDash also began to pitch investors on its IPO, seeking a market capitalisation as large as $27bn. DoorDash would raise more than $2.8bn if it priced its shares at the top end of its expected range.

Investors previously valued DoorDash at about $16bn in June as its business surged from a rise in takeout meal orders during lockdowns, pushing it to a surprise profit in the second quarter.

DoorDash plans to price its IPO in an auction-like process similar to the kind used by the video game software company Unity in September, according to people briefed on the offering. In that process, Unity set a price for its offering after soliciting orders with specific prices from prospective investors.

Airbnb and DoorDash are headlining a busy end of year period for new listings in the US, with the video gaming platform Roblox and ecommerce site Wish also looking to go public in December.

Corporate issuers have raised proceeds of almost $70bn in US-based IPOs this year, according to the data provider Refinitiv. That is the most in any year since 2014, when Alibaba set the record for the largest IPO.



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IPOs / FFOs

London celebrates but for Deliveroo IPO to succeed, it needs to deliver

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The City’s future is arriving by bicycle. It may not match what was ordered.

Deliveroo on Thursday made formal its promise to float in London. The Hill review of listings rules prompted the courier dispatch service to add a preamble to its intention to float statement, expected early next week. Lord Jonathan Hill gave Deliveroo’s politically savvy spin team a quote for the media blitz, as did Oliver Dowden MP and London Stock Exchange chief executive David Schwimmer. Looser rules, they all agreed, make London a more attractive destination for technology champions.

There’s a reason this looks like lobbying. Deliveroo founder Will Shu intends to retain control of the group, so his float will involve a two-tier shareholder structure. Under current rules, that means a standard listing and FTSE index exclusion. Investors will be offered the insurance policy of a three-year sunset clause, meaning premium status can still be secured even if the relaxed attitude to dual-class ownership never becomes law. The clause is a deadline Shu will want to neutralise.

The Deliveroo camp has been vague about potential valuations. Optimism runs as high as $10bn, with the floor provided by a fundraising agreed in January that put the headline value at just over $7bn. The success of online retailer THG — up 40 per cent since its standard-grade float in September — provides a useful benchmark for founder-controlled businesses.

But THG is a different proposition. Whereas its profitability is proven, Deliveroo is a cash-burning machine. Its accounts show losses of £133m in 2016, £199m in 2017, £231m in 2018 and £318m in 2019. Lockdowns perked up performance — the January fundraising preceded six months of operating profitability, according to Shu — but only after an early wobble that convinced the Competition and Markets Authority in April last year to show charity to what it called a “failing firm”.

Profitability rarely matters much in food delivery. Germany’s Delivery Hero and DoorDash in the US both have stratospheric valuations and conceptual business plans where any route to profitability requires competitors to fail. What helps them is that ownership across the sector is a web of interconnections. All the main owners appear to apply the same strategy of securing market leadership or exiting.

Deliveroo is different. It was once considered a weak competitor, until Covid-19 came to lift all boats. It was once an acquisition target for any operator keen on tidying up an overly competitive UK market, until Amazon last year bought a 16 per cent blocking stake that can only be increased with CMA approval.

Now it’s a British tech champion, using pandemic-inflated metrics to give existing backers an exit opportunity and raise yet more cash to burn in search of a functional business model. Those rushing to celebrate its choice of IPO venue as a victory for regulatory liberalism might soon wish they had waited to see exactly what’s inside the box.

B&M’s no bargain

Investors have been filling baskets with B&M shares almost as fast as shoppers at the discount retailer have been stocking up on home essentials, writes Andrew Whiffin.

Stockpiling and lockdown demand helped propel the stock into the FTSE 100 index last year, but Thursday marked a crucial hurdle. In a fifth and likely final unscheduled trading update in the year to March, B&M said earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortisation would be £50m higher than it previously expected. The positive news was overshadowed by caution that the group’s final month would be up against tough comparisons from last year’s March spike in panic buying. 

The short period of uncertainty will help determine whether a good year for the retailer was a blip or part of a longer lasting trend. B&M estimated new customers in June accounted for almost a quarter of shoppers. A strong March would offer an indication that these B&M converts can become regulars. Shares trading at 17 times two-year forward earnings — the top of their recent valuation range — need signs of permanent market share gains to continue their upward journey.

The benefits of 2020 have flowed directly to shareholders, the largest being the holding company of the founding Arora brothers, with an 11 per cent stake. Special dividends of £600m in the past year push total returns to almost 60 per cent since the start of 2020, eclipsing the flat returns of the dominant UK grocers. 

Bulk buying for lockdowns is just one way the pandemic helped the group. Like-for-like sales growth of almost a quarter in the six months to September was supported by a higher mix of merchandise trade. Housebound consumers bought more DIY and gardening equipment helping to boost profit margins.

Ebitda in the first half of the year doubled while margins gained almost 5 percentage points, hitting 13.3 per cent. This is expected to ease in the coming year as one-off sales drop out of the numbers. Analysts’ consensus estimates for 2021/22 are at present about a tenth below those for the current year. 

B&M has been one of the biggest beneficiaries of harsh UK lockdowns that have left consumers bored, homebound and cash rich. As vaccine rollouts hasten a return to normal, that trade remains exposed.

Deliveroo: bryce.elder@ft.com
B&M: andrew.whiffin@ft.com

City Bulletin

Sign up to the City Bulletin newsletter for the latest company news. Every morning our UK equities reporter Bryce Elder covers the biggest business stories and delivers them straight to your inbox by 8am UK time.



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Deliveroo picks London for IPO after listings review

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Deliveroo has chosen London for its highly anticipated initial public offering after Rishi Sunak, the UK chancellor, endorsed an overhaul of listing rules to allow founders to retain more control after going public. 

The multibillion-pound IPO is expected to be among London’s largest this year, handing the City a much-needed win over New York and Amsterdam at a time of feverish activity in new tech listings. 

“Deliveroo is proud to be a British company, and the selection of London as its home for any future listing reflects Deliveroo’s continued commitment to the UK,” said Claudia Arney, Deliveroo’s chair. 

Deliveroo’s decision follows the publication on Wednesday of a review by Lord Jonathan Hill, former EU financial services commissioner, which recommended a wide range of reforms to loosen listing rules in the UK. 

Among Hill’s recommendations were proposals to allow dual-class share structures, which allow founders to hold on to extra voting rights after an IPO, to be used by companies trading on the London Stock Exchange’s “premium” segment. The dual-class arrangement is popular in Silicon Valley, where it is used by companies including Facebook and Google parent Alphabet. 

The move, which Sunak endorsed during Wednesday’s Budget, was designed to attract fast-growing tech companies such as Deliveroo, though some London fund managers fear the change puts shareholder protection at risk.

Deliveroo said in a statement on Thursday morning that its dual-class structure would be “closely in line” with the Hill review’s recommendations and be limited to three years. However, the changes are unlikely to come into force before it has completed its IPO, with initial paperwork expected to be filed as soon as next week.

Companies with dual-class structures can already trade on the LSE’s standard listing. Once the new rules are in place, Deliveroo would be able to move up to a premium listing. A person close to the company said that the Hill review was also likely to attract more tech companies to London, making it more attractive as a listing venue overall.

“Alongside the dual-class share structure, Deliveroo intends to have a strong commitment to corporate governance standards including a majority independent board of directors as well as upholding diversity standards,” the company said. 

Will Shu, Deliveroo’s co-founder and chief executive, said he was “proud and excited” to list in London, where the company first began making restaurant deliveries in 2013. 

Sunak hailed the decision as “fantastic”. 

“Deliveroo has created thousands of jobs and is a true British tech success story,” he said in a statement. “It is great news that the next stage of their growth will be on the public markets in the UK.”

Arney added: “London is not just where Deliveroo was born, it is one of the leading capital markets in the world, with an incredible technology ecosystem, sophisticated investment community and a skilled talent pool. The time-limited dual-class structure would provide Will and his team with the certainty needed to execute against their ambitious growth plan to become the definitive online food company.”



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Investors push back against UK listings overhaul

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London’s biggest fund managers have pushed back against proposals to liberalise the City’s stock market listings regime, saying changes aimed at luring in technology businesses and special purpose acquisition companies risk “watering down” investor protections.

A report by Lord Jonathan Hill, published on Wednesday, recommended allowing dual-class share structures for companies admitted to the London Stock Exchange’s “premium” segment, and lowering the limit on the free float of shares in public hands from 25 per cent to 15 per cent, meaning founders need to sell less of their business to list it. He also laid out proposals to make the UK a stronger potential venue for listings of blank-cheque companies known as Spacs.

UK companies and the country’s main listings venues, the LSE and Aquis Exchange, said the plans were vital to improving London’s attractions in a globally competitive market. But some investors are nervous.

Chris Cummings, chief executive of the Investment Association, the trade body that represents asset managers with a total of £8.5tn in assets, said the proposals were an “important first step”, but he warned that the UK needed to ensure “appropriate investor protections for minority shareholders”.

One large investor in UK-listed companies said it was strongly opposed “to the watering down of rules governing premium listing”. “Shareholder protections should not be used as a bargaining chip to prove the UK is open for business,” the investor said.

Another large global asset manager said the current standards for premium listings, including the principle of “one share, one vote”, were “critical”.

“The UK has gold standards for stewardship,” the fund manager said. “If we are going to create more flexibility for a listing, we would want over time [for companies to] work towards a premium listing with ‘one share, one vote’ and standard free float with sufficient liquidity.”

Some asset managers took a more upbeat view of the Hill review.

“Schroders is in full support of Lord Hill’s review. It is crucial that we do all we can to make the UK the most attractive place for companies to list and to do business for the benefit of investors,” said Peter Harrison, chief executive at Schroders, the biggest listed UK fund manager.

Hill’s proposals are intended to boost London’s global standing as an equity market, which has weakened in recent years as the US and Hong Kong have swept up the majority of in-demand tech listings. New York’s markets have also gained a boost from a wave of Spacs, which raise money from investors and list on a stock market, then look for an acquisition target to take public.

The departure of some large technology stocks such as Arm in recent years has cemented the blue-chip FTSE 100 index’s bias towards financials, energy and mining stocks. A loss of trading businesses to European rivals since Brexit has also further dulled the allure of the City.

The Hill recommendations are “smart, pragmatic measures”, added Sir Martin Sorrell, whose S4Capital digital market and advertising business has a dual-class share structure. “[It] also signals that the government’s ‘Singapore on Thames’ vision for a post-Brexit Britain is on the way to becoming a reality,” he said.

Makram Azar, chief executive of Golden Falcon, the European technology blank cheque company that opted to list in New York, said London needed to make significant structural changes.

“The recommendations will no doubt spur investors to look at listings on the LSE in the future. It will take time to develop the whole ecosystem around Spac listings in London, but this is the start of the sea change that’s needed.”

Others cautioned against the risks of making changes to attract blank cheque companies.

“Spac deals may be booming in the USA right now, but fear of missing out is just about the worst possible reason for making any investment decision,” said Russ Mould, investment director at stockbroker AJ Bell. “It is therefore to be hoped that the FCA maintains its critical faculties when it assesses Lord Hill’s proposals and the safeguards that he offers alongside them.”



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