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English stately homes and fantasy camps inspire this month’s escapes

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Travel and travel planning are being disrupted by the worldwide spread of coronavirus. For the latest updates, read the FT’s coverage of the outbreak

The façade of Goodnestone Park, near Canterbury
The façade of Goodnestone Park, near Canterbury © Goodnestone Park
Inside the house
Inside the house © Goodnestone Park

Immaculate gardens with impeccable literary credentials
Thoughts may well be turning to post-lockdown English escapes. One to bookmark? A gorgeous period house with an intriguing history, available for private use. The 15 acres of immaculately tended gardens at Goodnestone Park are considered some of the finest in south England, and boast impressive literary credentials: they were a favourite of Jane Austen, whose brother Edward married into the owner’s family. She was known to enjoy the Serpentine Walk (now a public footpath that roughly circumnavigates the house’s grounds), and it has been floated that the manor was a model for Longbourn and Netherfield Park, two of the houses in Pride and Prejudice. A full 24 people can have the run of the property for long weekends. And the rooms – dense with chintzes and eggshell paints in National Trust-approved tones – are more or less exactly what you’d expect, in a good way. goodnestoneparkgardens.co.uk; POA

Singita Sabora Tented Camp in Tanzania
Singita Sabora Tented Camp in Tanzania © Singita

Reinventing the classic safari camp
Botswana is a place of legend across all strata of safari excellence: wildlife and wilderness, guiding and conservation of course, but also camps with stellar design and food and wine fit for card-carrying gourmands. One name long familiar to Africaphiles will, as of January, be in play here again. Back in its day (which was many years ago), Xigera was among the finest camps in the Okavango Delta. Now it’s been reclaimed in a compelling way under owners Red Carnation, who bring the hotel nous and spectacular design, showcasing the work of over 80 African artists and makers. They are assisted by safari-conservation outfit Great Plains, whose founders Dereck and Beverly Joubert have some of the realest bona fides on the continent. The 12 suites lace the water’s edge of a prime position in the Moremi Game Reserve. Expect visual delights, velvety skies and all manner of charismatic megafauna, including black rhino. Up in Tanzania, the dab hands running Singita’s operations on the Grumeti reserve have spent the Covid pause reinventing Singita Sabora. Gone are all the hyper-nostalgic steam trunks and hard woods; in their place come sleek new design interpretations in leather and canvas, private meditation decks and day beds. (Singita Grumeti’s 350,000 private acres, home each summer to a swath of the great wildebeest migration, require no sell.) xigera.com; from $2,320 per person per night. singita.com; from $1,650pp per night

A thinking person’s guide to Colombia
Plan South America’s Harry Hastings is the man with the intel we trust on all points south of Mexico. His latest – an intriguing new villa on Colombia’s lush Barú Peninsula, about an hour south of Cartagena – comes online next month. Casa Letty is a fairly unique proposition here, a spectacular private accommodation with a dual remit: to amplify its social impact and minimise its environmental one (it’s 100 per cent solar powered – but with backup generator systems, in case – with full groundwater recycling and filtration systems, composting, and its own vegetable and fruit gardens). To further their social end, Hastings and his team are working with a Swiss-backed local philanthropic organisation, Somos Barú, on creating cultural, culinary and artisan experiences that rely entirely on, and empower, the local indigenous communities, women in particular. His guests will benefit, of course; but the idea is to seed a more thoughtful brand of tourism in a region that’s sorely in need of it. plansouthamerica.com; from $1,995 per night, including activities

Camp Kasbah’s Mauri Waneka (standing) and Tess Ferguson
Camp Kasbah’s Mauri Waneka (standing) and Tess Ferguson

How to escape Aspen – in Aspen
Nobody gets bored on or off the slopes in Aspen; between the late-night hijinks at J-Bar and the daytime allure of the Shigeru Ban-designed art museum there’s ample stimulation to be had. But Camp Kasbah advances a novel proposal: a private retreat from Aspen, in Aspen. Set to open next month below the summit of Buttermilk Mountain, the 1,400sq m camp – with seven bedrooms, 10 baths, spa and gym facilities, an “après” tent complete with fire pit and a treehouse designed by local architect Charles Cunniffe – is the brainchild of LA-based Native Design & Development founders Mauri Waneka and Tess Ferguson. It’s intended for group bookings, and offers the kind of outings, experiences, ambience and food that will evoke the halcyon experience of the classic American summer camp, but for adults – ones with serious means, and some hedonism on the agenda. A smart detail of “rangers” is on hand to plan indoor and outdoor activities. Beyond hiking, hacks through the snow and cross-country skiing are whimsies such as millinery and pysanka, the Ukrainian art of egg decorating. (NB: diehard minimalists need not apply; the decor, with elements of Morocco, the Continent and First Nations peoples, is of the more-is-more bent.) campkasbah.com; from $15,000 per night for buyout

@mariashollenbarger





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Turkey bans crypto payments for goods and services

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Turkey has barred the use of cryptocurrencies to purchase goods and services in an effort to protect consumers against volatility and illegal activity, threatening a boom in the country’s fast-growing digital money markets.

The central bank published a regulation in its official gazette on Friday that prohibits the direct and indirect use of crypto assets as payments. The anonymous use of virtual money “may cause non-recoverable losses” and “undermine the confidence in methods and instruments used currently in payments”, a statement from the bank said.

Turkey has the largest volume of cryptocurrency transactions in the Middle East and ranks 29th out of 154 countries worldwide, according to a report last year by Chainalysis, a US-based blockchain analysis company.

Turks have poured money into digital money in recent years to hedge against double-digit inflation and a 34 per cent drop in the value of the lira against the dollar since the start of 2019. The lack of regulation and taxation has also made the asset popular, and the trend mirrors a global surge in crypto investments.

The new measures come during a time when many countries are grappling with how to regulate digital currencies, which often fall between different national watchdogs and stretch through international boundaries. In the US, for example, tax authorities have this year sought information from exchanges about users executing large transactions.

Bitcoin, the word’s dominant digital coin, hit a record of almost $65,000 earlier this week, while Coinbase, one of the biggest crypto exchanges, listed on US public markets and is now valued at about $64bn.

The Turkish boom poses “significant risks” when crypto is used for payments, the central bank said, citing the lack of regulatory oversight, excessive volatility, the potential for use in illicit activities, theft of digital wallets and the irrevocable nature of transactions required.

The ban, the first of its kind in Turkey, comes after the financial authorities signalled regulations were in store. Last month the Treasury ministry said it was concerned about the level of growth.

The regulation does not prohibit ownership of crypto assets for investment but the new rules are unclear about when a purchase of these assets constitutes a payment, said Wolfango Piccoli, co-president of Teneo Intelligence. Banks are excluded, which means users may still transfer money from their bank accounts to crypto exchanges.

“Turkish authorities have been trying to keep a tight grip on the payment ecosystem for some time,” he said, pointing to the five-year ban on PayPal, the US-based online payment system.

President Recep Tayyip Erdogan has urged Turks to sell their vast foreign currency holdings to prop up the lira, particularly after he sacked the central bank governor last month and sparked a sell-off in financial markets over worries about his meddling in monetary policy.

The latest central bank move “may be aimed at protecting the value of the national currency and directing investment to the bourse”, said Enver Erkan, chief economist at Tera Securities in Istanbul, referring to the country’s regulated Borsa Istanbul financial exchange.

“Crypto has emerged as a very serious alternative because [Turkish investors] are afraid of the stock market, the exchange rate is unpredictable and gold is expensive,” he added.



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Korea’s Coupang hands cash to bereaved families at workers’ funerals

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When Park Mi-sook held a funeral ceremony for her late son Jang Duk-joon in Daegu, South Korea, last October, managers from his former employer Coupang gave her an envelope containing Won3m ($2,600) in cash.

According to handwritten funeral registries, the ecommerce company, which listed in New York last month with a valuation of $80bn, also handed cash to the families of at least two other recently deceased workers.

The payments have done little to assuage the families’ grief over the deaths, which they attribute to overwork. The bereaved families of the three people, who previously worked at logistics centres owned by Coupang, are considering suing the company and its subcontractors. 

“We are seeking an apology, preventive measures and compensation for my son’s death but have been unable to have talks with the company in earnest,” said Park. “We are considering a lawsuit in the US.”

Her son Jang, 27, was found dead in his bathtub in October after finishing his night shift at Coupang’s warehouse in Daegu.

Coupang initially denied responsibility for Jang’s death but an official investigation by the Korea Workers’ Compensation and Welfare Service (KCOMWEL) found that he died of a heart attack because of overwork. 

“We were devastated by his sudden death but there was no word of apology from them, let alone admitting that my son’s death was due to overwork,” Park told the Financial Times. 

Labour lawyers and union officials allege that eight Coupang workers, including two subcontractors, have died from overwork over the past year. 

The ecommerce company, which is backed by investors such as SoftBank, Sequoia and BlackRock, vehemently denies responsibility for the deaths, saying only one has officially been acknowledged as work-related. But it is facing increasing political pressure over the incidents.

The family of Park Hyun-kyung, 37, who died in June after working as a subcontractor at a cafeteria in Coupang’s facility in Cheonan, has filed a criminal complaint with the labour ministry against the ecommerce group and two other contractors for allegedly violating the country’s industrial safety law.

Her husband, Choi Dong-beom, said the companies had rejected his requests for meetings. Choi has filed a claim with KCOMWEL for compensation. The state-run Occupational Safety and Health Research Institute is looking into the cause of the death, according to KCOMWEL. 

South Korean companies pay insurance fees to KCOMWEL, which then compensates workers if their injuries are recognised as work-related.

“She had suffered from constant headaches and coughing for months before her death,” said Choi. “But the companies have shown no interest in her death, passing the buck to each other.”

Coupang has countered that a police investigation determined the company was not responsible for Park Hyun-kyung’s death. It said she worked for Dongwon Homefood, a food services conglomerate that provided goods and services to 7,000 companies nationwide, including Coupang. 

Park Mi-sook, the mother of the deceased worker Jang, accused Coupang of not being co-operative in providing work-related information needed to file compensation claims. “I felt humiliated in the process of seeking information from the company,” she said.

According to data provided by ruling party lawmaker Im Jong-sung, workers at Coupang Fulfillment Services, Coupang’s logistics arm, filed 239 claims of work injuries to KCOMWEL for compensation last year. 

Im said Coupang denied 28.5 per cent of claims as work-related, a rate three times higher than the average for Korean companies. However, KCOMWEL has said only 15 of these cases were not work-related.

“If the employer doesn’t admit to work injuries, claimants have to experience a lot of difficulties and pain to prove their injuries are work-related,” said Im.

When asked by the FT about the Won3m in cash payments at the funerals and potential compensation claims, Coupang said it offered support for bereaved families of employees regardless of the cause of death, “including group accident insurance, financial support for the funeral, and condolence money”.

“Any death is a tragedy, regardless of the reason,” Coupang said. “As is customary in Korea, it is our practice to visit the funeral of former workers, give condolences and provide support for families.” 

The company said that of the eight deaths, two were not Coupang employees but on-site contractors and these were not accident-related.

Of the other six deaths, Coupang said, three occurred at home or during vacation and three at work. The three on-site deaths were heart attack-related and none were due to accidents. All of the workers in question worked under 52 hours a week, it said.

“The union is trying to portray as work-related all heart and coronary-related incidents including those that occur at home or on vacation,” the company said. “Cardiac and cerebrovascular disorders are the second and fourth leading causes of death in Korea, and Coupang’s rate of both disorders are lower than the national average in Korea.”

Coupang is not legally obliged to compensate the families of deceased workers unless it loses lawsuits filed by the bereaved, according to South Korean labour laws.

Labour researcher Jang Kwi-yeon said the offer of cash at funerals did not mean the company was admitting legal liability. But she added: “It should be seen as an expression of their moral responsibility.”



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Putin’s sabre-rattling wins west’s attention and Biden summit

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If Vladimir Putin’s decision to deploy tens of thousands of troops to Ukraine’s border in the past few weeks was driven primarily by a desire to get the west’s attention, he did not have to wait too long for his reward.

Hours after his defence minister on Tuesday admitted Russia had mobilised two armies and three paratrooper divisions to positions close to the conflict-wracked frontier, US President Joe Biden phoned the Kremlin with an offer of a bilateral summit: a long sought-after prize for Putin who craves a seat at the world’s highest negotiating table.

By then, Moscow was only confirming what satellite imagery, social media footage and increasingly frantic statements from Kyiv had indicated: Russia had massed more troops on its western border than at any time since its 2014 invasion of Crimea.

Those 50,000 extra soldiers, scores of tanks and other heavy weaponry spooked Kyiv and other European powers, and sparked a hurried response from Nato and the US amid fears over a potential outbreak of fighting between the two countries. 

But while Russian officials have warned of a conflict that would “end” Ukraine, so far only a barrage of warlike rhetoric has crossed the border, with Russia’s troops merely lurking with intent.

That has led experts to conclude Moscow’s intention was to merely scare its neighbours, test the level of support for Ukraine among Biden’s new administration, and remind the White House of Russia’s leverage in European security.

“Russia sent a clear signal that in the current context of the deterioration of US-Russia relations, Moscow is not prepared to make any more concessions regarding Ukraine,” said Ruslan Pukhov, director of the Centre for Analysis of Strategies and Technologies, a Russian defence think-tank. “The message was: we either stop where we are now, or we will move forward.”

Ukrainian soldiers near Marinka in the Donetsk region of Ukraine
Ukrainian soldiers hold a position on the frontline with Russian-backed separatists near Marinka in the Donetsk region of Ukraine © AFP/Getty Images

Since Russia’s 2014 invasion and annexation of Ukraine’s Crimea peninsula, pro-Russian separatists have fought against Ukrainian forces for control of Donbas, the Ukrainian region on the border with Russia, killing more than 14,000.

Kyiv accuses Moscow of stoking the conflict with weapons, military support and irregular troops. Moscow denies direct involvement but says it has a duty to protect the Russian-speaking population who live there. 

Both sides accuse the other of failing to adhere to the Minsk agreements, a 2015 peace deal, and of constant provocations across the line of contact. Many see frustration at Kyiv as the major factor behind Moscow’s decision to remind its neighbour of its significantly larger military might.

“With the current state of Russia-Ukrainian relations, we have no other tools to influence Kyiv except the threat of force and the use of force. The other diplomatic tools are really limited,” said Pukhov, who is also a member of the Russian defence ministry’s public council.

“Russia does it not because it is cruel by nature, but because it is the only way to exert any pressure or influence on them,” he added.

Sergei Shoigu, Russia’s defence minister, on Tuesday said the troops had been deployed as part of “appropriate measures” in response to threats from Nato, which he said was preparing to move 40,000 troops and 15,000 weapons to the Russian border.

The Russian troops were conducting exercises “at present”, he said, but “show full readiness and ability to fulfil tasks to ensure the country’s military security”.

Dmitri Trenin, head of the Moscow Carnegie Center, suggested that western support for Kyiv had increased the stakes in the Russia-Ukraine conflict by making it increasingly the focal point of broader tension between Moscow and Nato, and thus forcing the Kremlin to take a belligerent stance.

“Thanks to the uncritical and automatic support that Ukraine invariably gets from the US and its allies, Kyiv has the ability to put Russia in what Germans and chess players call Zugzwang,” he said. “Any move a player can or has to take only worsens the player’s position.”

In a move seen as an initiative to calm the situation, Biden on Monday used a telephone call with Putin to “propose a summit meeting in a third country in the coming months”, according to the White House readout of the conversation.

In the call, Biden also “voiced our concerns over the sudden Russian military build-up” and “emphasised the United State’s unwavering commitment to Ukraine’s sovereignty and territorial integrity”.

The summit format will also please the Kremlin by effectively cutting Kyiv out of any negotiations, and allow Putin to project the image of two global superpowers deciding the future fate of the conflict.

But a long-term settlement appears unattainable at present, with both sides failing to comply with the terms of the Minsk agreement and wary that any moves to de-escalate could be seized on by the other as an opportunity to extract more leverage. 

Russian and Nato warships have been dispatched to the Black Sea and the western alliance is preparing a number of large military exercises in eastern European states this summer, a move likely to keep tensions simmering. 

“Instead of making Russia behave, the west is adding to the dynamic which might ultimately lead to collision,” said Trenin. “There will be no second coming of Mikhail Gorbachev.”

“Let’s face it: regional war in Europe is again thought of as a possibility on both sides, and this should not make anyone happy. Even in the US, because such a war will not be limited to the Old Continent,” he added. “Fasten your seat belts.”



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