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Call for entries: Europe’s Climate Leaders 2021

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For the first time, the Financial Times and Statista, the German data provider, are compiling a list of European companies that have achieved the greatest reduction in emissions intensity. 

The aim of the ranking is to highlight the businesses whose greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) intensity — that is, GHG emissions relative to revenue — fell the most between 2014 and 2019. The ranking will be published in a print edition of the Financial Times in spring 2021, as well as online at ft.com

All European companies with a minimum revenue of €40m or £36m in 2019 are eligible for consideration (see below for the full list of eligible countries). 

In order to participate, we invite you to fill out a short questionnaire about your company’s GHG emissions for all available years between 2014 and 2019, and its revenue over the same period (or, for banks, the yield). We also ask you to send us a data verification form

Potential candidates will be contacted by Statista or can put their name forward at this website

The ranking will be determined by the compound annual reduction rate (CARR) of the emissions intensity. More information about the methodology, conditions of participation and useful contacts can be found at the Statista website.


Why should my company participate?

▩ NEW BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES

Inclusion in the Europe’s Climate Leaders list will be a visible and public acknowledgment of your company’s environmental performance that extends far beyond your specific industry and country. It will also generate attention for your business on the part of potential partners, customers, employees and investors around the world.

▩ EFFECTIVE MEDIA COVERAGE

The ranking will be covered in a special report, a supplement within a weekday edition of the FT newspaper and on FT.com. The full ranking will be published online, while the report will include articles by FT journalists on interesting companies, sectors and trends within the sustainability field. 

▩ REPUTATION

All companies that make it into the list may use the award logo for marketing purposes¹.

▩ ACCESS TO MORE THAN 1M FACTS

All participants that provide us with data on their GHG emissions and revenue will receive a free two-week Statista corporate subscription trial — irrespective of whether or not they are among the companies listed in the ranking.

¹ The use of the label and the word-and-image logo “Europe’s Climate Leaders 2021” for marketing purposes is subject to a one-off payment of a licence fee. Inclusion in the ranking, however, is completely free of charge.


Who is eligible?

To be considered for inclusion in the ranking your company must meet the following criteria:

  • Revenue of at least €40m/£36m generated in 2019¹

  • Must be independent (ie the company applying to participate is not a subsidiary or a branch office of another company)

  • Must be headquartered in Europe²

    ¹ Non-euro countries: currency value equivalent as of 31/12/2019.
    ² Eligible to participate are all companies from these countries: Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Monaco, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, United Kingdom.


How do I register?

STEP ONE: ONLINE REGISTRATION

Please register with Statista online here, by December 15 2020. Alternatively, you can download the form and send it to climate-europe@statista.com upon completion (also available in Spanish via the links below).

STEP TWO: DaTA VERIFICATION

Your emissions and revenue data need to be verified. The necessary form is appended to the downloadable version of the registration document, for which links are given below. The form must be signed in person by a managing director or a member of your executive committee (CEO or CSR) and then sent to Statista by email, fax or mail. All necessary address details can be found on the form.

Online registration webpage: English/Spanish

Registration/data verification form PDF: English / Spanish


Contact details

Should you have any additional questions or would otherwise like to contact us, please email climate-europe@statista.com



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Analysis

Can plant-based milk beat conventional dairy?

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Plant-based milk brands are churning up the global dairy business, with a surge in sales, investment, and new products coming to market. The plant derived dairy trade is now worth an estimated $17bn worldwide.

Growing consumer demand has boosted investment. According to data firm Dealroom, venture capital funding across the plant-based dairy and egg sector has skyrocketed, from $64m in 2015 to $1.6bn in 2020.

The world’s biggest food company, Nestle, recently launched its first international plant-based dairy brand, a cow’s milk substitute made from yellow peas. Wonder will come in a variety of flavours, competing with established brands like Oatly oat-based milk. Founded in Sweden in the 1990s, that company is now valued at around $15bn. Demand for alternatives to soya, which once dominated the dairy free market, continues to escalate.

In the west, sales for other plant-based milks, including oat, cashew, coconut, hemp, and other seeds overtook soya back in 2014. Since then, they’ve raced ahead to be worth almost three times as much as soya products, with a combined projected value of more than $5bn in sales by 2022.

Advocates argue that plant-based production emits less greenhouse gas than cattle, making it the way forward to help feed the world and curb global warming. But dairy groups are fighting back with their own sustainability campaigns. And cow’s milk is hard to beat when it comes to naturally occurring nutrients, like protein, vitamins and minerals.

The average 100 millilitre glass of cow’s milk contains three grammes of protein, compared to 2.2 grammes in pea milk and just one gramme in oat-based substitutes.

Dairy producers have also won a legal bid, preventing vegan competitors in the EU from calling their products milk and yoghurt. Despite their growing popularity, plant-based brands are a long way from displacing conventional milk products. Their current $17bn turnover is still a drop in the pail, compared with the traditional cattle-based dairy trade, which is worth an estimated $650bn worldwide.



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Analysis

'It’s more than sport – every day we are fighting for our rights to be equal’

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French pro basketball player and podcaster Diandra Tchatchouang on her role beyond the court



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Analysis

Emily Dean on how allyship amplifies the female experience on film

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When I was six years old, I decided to be an artist. When I was 12, I decided to be a filmmaker. And instead of saying no, you can’t do that, or it’s not possible, my mum bought me a video camera.

After several years of working in the industry, I’m working with a female director for the first time. And it’s been such a gratifying experience. Women express leadership in different ways. Maybe you don’t have to be the loudest person in the room. But you can have great ideas.

And the best thing about being mentored by women and being a mentor to women is that make friends with women.

There’s something so powerful the women coming alongside other women, especially in a group setting. Because it means that you can and back each other up. You can support each other’s decisions, and you can amplify each other’s voices.

It’s about seeing yourself in your work. Seeing some part of yourself reflected is really gratifying. It’s also important that we speak up for female characters. I want to see girls and women on screen who have the whole cacophony of experience of what it’s like to be female.

I want to see their flaws. I want to feel their struggles. I want to see their joy. That is so important to making a character feel real. And it took me a little while to settle into myself and realise, if the characters I like to come up with are not your everyday run of the mill characters you see in animation, that’s fine. Because this is who I am.

When you walk into a story room, when you’re working on a film, you have to leave your ego at the door. I think that can be interpreted like keep your ego out of the work. But I’d also say for women who are maybe more shy that leaving your ego at the door means you walk in. And your job is to focus on what’s best for the story and for the film.

The story needs you. The film needs you, and it needs your best ideas. It won’t thrive unless you speak up.



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