Connect with us

IPOs / FFOs

Palantir valued at $15.8bn in stock market debut

Published

on


Shares in Palantir closed below their debut price on Wednesday, dragging the data analysis company’s market value $4bn under the high water mark it reached five years ago.

Palantir stock initially surged more than 10 per cent above its $10 opening price but ended the day at $9.73, giving it a market value of $15.8bn. The valuation is short of the $20bn it reached in private hands in 2015, a gap partly explained by investors’ uncertainty about its attempted shift from a consultancy to a full software company.

The flotation was one of two direct listings on the New York Stock Exchange on Wednesday. Asana, the business software company led by Facebook co-founder Dustin Moskovitz, opened at $27 and ended the day at $29.96, valuing it at more than $4.6bn.

Asana sells task-management software used by organisations including Google and Nasa. At its most recent equity fundraising in November 2018, the company was valued at $1.5bn.

The duo enter a hot market for tech listings, following cloud computing company Snowflake’s $3.4bn initial public offering earlier in September. That marked the largest IPO of the year and the biggest on record for a US software group.

At the end of day, Palantir was valued well below other recently listed software companies, at 15 times this year’s expected revenue, despite a projected growth rate of more than 40 per cent. However, Brendan Burke, tech analyst at PitchBook, said even this looked high, and that it was “speculative” to assume the company would achieve the predictable growth typical in the software industry.

Shyam Sankar, chief operating officer, said Palantir had originally planned to go public late next year, giving it more time to demonstrate that its attempted shift to a pure software business model was bearing fruit. But he said the pandemic had brought a flood of new business and accelerated the company’s plans.

The twin debuts were also a test for direct listings, a process that has emerged as an alternative to the traditional IPO. Unlike in an IPO, the companies had to match demand from public investors with supply from existing private shareholders to execute their first trades.

Palantir and Asana used Morgan Stanley as lead adviser and Citadel Securities as the market maker overseeing the trading for both listings.

“Both companies are fast growing and highly unprofitable,” said Bill Smith, chief executive of Renaissance Capital, a fund manager of IPO exchange traded funds. “Asana has achieved a sticky customer base and strong net retention, and Palantir has long contracts with its customers.”

On Tuesday, the New York Stock Exchange released a reference price of $7.25 for Palantir, implying the company would have a market capitalisation of about $11.7bn. The exchange put Asana’s reference price at $21.

Reference prices, based on private trades, act as a guide to the market but are not the same as an IPO price, which is the amount investors pay for shares in a typical flotation. Both Slack and Spotify, which went public through direct listings, traded above their reference prices upon listing.

Palantir stands apart from the Silicon Valley tech establishment for brandishing its close ties to the national security community. 

The company is led by Alex Karp and co-founded by Peter Thiel, the venture capitalist whose support for President Donald Trump has placed him at odds with his more left-leaning peers. Along with another co-founder, Stephen Cohen, they will retain control of the company through a complex voting structure that has raised concerns among corporate governance watchdogs.

Unlike in similar direct listings, Palantir will keep the majority of its stock locked up for months after it goes public, allowing only a portion of its class A common stock to trade on the first day.

The direct listings join 11 IPOs this week, making it one of the year’s busiest. The run of flotations has tracked the booming stock market rally against the backdrop of the Covid-19 pandemic. 

Proceeds raised in IPOs for the year have already eclipsed every year since 2014, when Alibaba set a record for the largest US listing, according to Refinitiv data.



Source link

Continue Reading
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

IPOs / FFOs

Quorn owner Monde Nissin plans record Manila debut share offer

Published

on

By


The Philippines’ top instant noodle producer and owner of UK meat substitute maker Quorn plans to raise as much as $1.5bn from what would be a record initial public offering in Manila.

Monde Nissin, which produces Lucky Me! instant noodles and SkyFlakes crackers, said on Thursday in an IPO prospectus that it would sell 3.6bn shares at up to 17.50 pesos each to raise a total of up to 63bn pesos ($1.3bn).

The listing could raise as much as $1.5bn if banks on the deal exercise an option to sell 540m additional shares.

At $1.3bn, the IPO would already be the largest by a Philippine company as well as a record debut share offer in Manila.

Monde Nissin said the funds raised would be used to boost production at its flagship noodle brand in the Philippines and to increase capacity at Quorn, which Mondo Nissin acquired in 2015 for £550m.

Quorn has enjoyed strong demand in recent years, bolstered by high-profile domestic hits including a “vegan-friendly” sausage roll sold at bakery chain Greggs. Quorn has also partnered with Liverpool Football Club to offer meat-free meals on match days.

But it has struggled to turn out enough of its fungus-based meat substitute to move substantially beyond its retail customer base, even as competitors such as Beyond Meat have clinched deals with chains including McDonald’s.

“They just don’t have enough supply; in the US [in particular] that’s really held them back,” said one banker on the deal, pointing to the limited rollout of a Quorn-based vegan burger known as “The Impostor” through a partnership with KFC.

The banker said Quorn was “going to attack the US much more aggressively” once it boosted capacity. Assuming sufficient supply, there was a long list of fast food clients who would “adopt Quorn because it’s competitive on the chicken side”, the banker added.

The listing, which is expected to price in April, would be the latest big offering in what bankers say is on pace to be one of the strongest years yet for IPOs in south-east Asia — one of the first regions outside China to be hit by the Covid-19 pandemic, and which is expected to be among the first to emerge from it.

ThaiBev, the drinks group, is poised to list its brewery business in Singapore in a deal expected to raise about $2bn and potentially value the unit at up to $10bn, people familiar with the matter told the Financial Times in January.

The Monde Nissin IPO is a rarity for the Philippines in that the entirety of the base offering will be new shares, rather than being sold off by existing shareholders.

Pre-IPO stakeholders include Betty Ang, the company’s president, and the family of her Indonesian husband — the son of Hidayat Darmono, who founded Indonesia’s dominant biscuit maker Khong Guan.

Both Ang and her extended family keep a notoriously low profile. One banker on the deal described Ang and her relatives as “very, very private”.

Bookrunners on the Monde Nissin IPO include UBS, Citigroup and Credit Suisse.



Source link

Continue Reading

IPOs / FFOs

Asian bourses look to join Spacs craze despite governance concerns

Published

on

By


The Indonesia Stock Exchange has become the third Asian bourse, after Hong Kong and Singapore, to explore allowing special purpose acquisition vehicles, prompting concerns about investor protection as Wall Street’s mania for the vehicles extends to the region.

Investors have poured almost $3bn into Spacs focused on acquiring Asian companies this year, nearly doubling the amount committed during all of 2020, according to Dealogic.

Last year, there was only one Spac deal involving a company based in an Asian country, and just five successful listings of Asian start-ups via Spacs in the past five years.

The rush for targets from a widening pool of investor cash has prompted concerns among some sponsors about inflated valuations for young companies, where management teams may be unprepared for the regulatory requirements of a US listing.

It has also come despite efforts by Asian bourses to tighten restrictions to block backdoor listings and other deals that avoid the strict independent due diligence required of a traditional IPO.

“Everyone is chasing the same deals,” said Frank Troise, chief executive of SoHo Advisors, a boutique US investment bank. “In some cases, there are 12 to 15 sponsors chasing one target.”

Spacs raise money by listing on a stock exchange and then using the proceeds to take promising private businesses public through reverse takeovers. Shareholders do not know which businesses the vehicles will target and invest based on the records of those sponsoring the Spacs.

Investors poured $100bn into Spacs globally last year. The trend has continued into 2021, with 188 vehicles raising $58bn in the US alone.

Some of Asia’s best-known investors and richest tycoons have waded into the asset class, including Ken Hitchner, who ran Goldman Sachs in Asia Pacific, and Fred Hu, a China private equity veteran.

Richard Li, son of Hong Kong tycoon Li Ka-shing and one of the city’s most prominent businessmen, and Peter Thiel, the US tech investor, have also backed large acquisition vehicles aimed at opportunities in the region.

Many Spacs are targeting south-east Asian tech companies, especially after the meteoric rise of New York-listed Sea, a Singapore-headquartered gaming and ecommerce company that was one of the world’s best-performing stocks last year.

GM020307_21X Global Spac acquisitions

Yet most of south-east Asia’s nascent start-ups are valued at under $3bn, the threshold bankers and investors said was needed to take a company public in the US.

The level of interest is there for south-east Asia but “the amount of actual suitable targets is not”, said Ee Ling Lim, a regional director for venture capital firm 500 Startups.

Only a few of the Asia-focused Spacs launched this year had local sponsors or ones with a history of investing in the region.

These included Provident Acquisition, a $200m Spac focused on Asia launched by south-east Asian fund Provident Growth. The firm has backed Gojek, Indonesia’s biggest start-up, and Traveloka, another one of the country’s four unicorns, or private companies valued at over $1bn.

“There are quite a few unicorns already in south-east Asia and more next generation companies coming through, some of which are ready for public markets,” said Michael Aw, chief executive of Provident Acquisition.

Beyond south-east Asia, some Spacs are targeting larger markets including India, where companies are regarded as more mature. Last week, ReNew Power, one of India’s largest renewable energy groups, unveiled plans to go public in New York through an $8bn deal with a Spac.

The New York Stock Exchange and Nasdaq are the prime venues for such listings. But Asian markets are increasingly looking to grab a share.

Johnson Chui, head of Asia capital markets at Credit Suisse, warned that implementing a Spac issuance framework in Singapore, Hong Kong or Indonesia would require “a lot of education” for stakeholders.

Column chart of Total deal value of Asia-focused Spacs ($bn) showing Global boom in Spacs swings to Asia

Hong Kong has captured tech listings in the region but Singapore and regional bourses including Indonesia have grappled with how to convince homegrown unicorns to list locally.

Allowing Spacs would provide companies with “another alternative for fundraising”, said Pandu Sjahrir, Indonesia Stock Exchange commissioner, adding that companies could then tap local bond and bank lending markets with no currency mismatch.

Indonesia has provided fiscal incentives for companies to pursue domestic listings, with capital gains tax falling to 0.1 per cent from 22 per cent for those that list locally.

However, Asia’s limited history of companies successfully going public through a Spac could weigh on the region’s prospects.

New Frontier Group, an investment firm run by Anthony Leung, Hong Kong’s former financial secretary, merged Chinese private hospital United Family Healthcare with its Spac on the New York Stock Exchange in 2019.

But the company has consistently traded below its $10 a share initial offering price and is set to be taken private by a consortium led by Leung. The proposed buyout would value New Frontier Health at $12 a share.

Sponsors have also come under increasing scrutiny for their lucrative compensation, typically receiving a 20 per cent stake in the company for a nominal sum of $25,000.

“Regulators in Asia spent a lot of time cutting backdoor listings because all sorts of folks loved them for making a quick buck,” said one senior investment banker. “Where it falls apart is if we have unscrupulous sponsors or companies trying to get into this market.”



Source link

Continue Reading

IPOs / FFOs

London celebrates but for Deliveroo IPO to succeed, it needs to deliver

Published

on

By


The City’s future is arriving by bicycle. It may not match what was ordered.

Deliveroo on Thursday made formal its promise to float in London. The Hill review of listings rules prompted the courier dispatch service to add a preamble to its intention to float statement, expected early next week. Lord Jonathan Hill gave Deliveroo’s politically savvy spin team a quote for the media blitz, as did Oliver Dowden MP and London Stock Exchange chief executive David Schwimmer. Looser rules, they all agreed, make London a more attractive destination for technology champions.

There’s a reason this looks like lobbying. Deliveroo founder Will Shu intends to retain control of the group, so his float will involve a two-tier shareholder structure. Under current rules, that means a standard listing and FTSE index exclusion. Investors will be offered the insurance policy of a three-year sunset clause, meaning premium status can still be secured even if the relaxed attitude to dual-class ownership never becomes law. The clause is a deadline Shu will want to neutralise.

The Deliveroo camp has been vague about potential valuations. Optimism runs as high as $10bn, with the floor provided by a fundraising agreed in January that put the headline value at just over $7bn. The success of online retailer THG — up 40 per cent since its standard-grade float in September — provides a useful benchmark for founder-controlled businesses.

But THG is a different proposition. Whereas its profitability is proven, Deliveroo is a cash-burning machine. Its accounts show losses of £133m in 2016, £199m in 2017, £231m in 2018 and £318m in 2019. Lockdowns perked up performance — the January fundraising preceded six months of operating profitability, according to Shu — but only after an early wobble that convinced the Competition and Markets Authority in April last year to show charity to what it called a “failing firm”.

Profitability rarely matters much in food delivery. Germany’s Delivery Hero and DoorDash in the US both have stratospheric valuations and conceptual business plans where any route to profitability requires competitors to fail. What helps them is that ownership across the sector is a web of interconnections. All the main owners appear to apply the same strategy of securing market leadership or exiting.

Deliveroo is different. It was once considered a weak competitor, until Covid-19 came to lift all boats. It was once an acquisition target for any operator keen on tidying up an overly competitive UK market, until Amazon last year bought a 16 per cent blocking stake that can only be increased with CMA approval.

Now it’s a British tech champion, using pandemic-inflated metrics to give existing backers an exit opportunity and raise yet more cash to burn in search of a functional business model. Those rushing to celebrate its choice of IPO venue as a victory for regulatory liberalism might soon wish they had waited to see exactly what’s inside the box.

B&M’s no bargain

Investors have been filling baskets with B&M shares almost as fast as shoppers at the discount retailer have been stocking up on home essentials, writes Andrew Whiffin.

Stockpiling and lockdown demand helped propel the stock into the FTSE 100 index last year, but Thursday marked a crucial hurdle. In a fifth and likely final unscheduled trading update in the year to March, B&M said earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortisation would be £50m higher than it previously expected. The positive news was overshadowed by caution that the group’s final month would be up against tough comparisons from last year’s March spike in panic buying. 

The short period of uncertainty will help determine whether a good year for the retailer was a blip or part of a longer lasting trend. B&M estimated new customers in June accounted for almost a quarter of shoppers. A strong March would offer an indication that these B&M converts can become regulars. Shares trading at 17 times two-year forward earnings — the top of their recent valuation range — need signs of permanent market share gains to continue their upward journey.

The benefits of 2020 have flowed directly to shareholders, the largest being the holding company of the founding Arora brothers, with an 11 per cent stake. Special dividends of £600m in the past year push total returns to almost 60 per cent since the start of 2020, eclipsing the flat returns of the dominant UK grocers. 

Bulk buying for lockdowns is just one way the pandemic helped the group. Like-for-like sales growth of almost a quarter in the six months to September was supported by a higher mix of merchandise trade. Housebound consumers bought more DIY and gardening equipment helping to boost profit margins.

Ebitda in the first half of the year doubled while margins gained almost 5 percentage points, hitting 13.3 per cent. This is expected to ease in the coming year as one-off sales drop out of the numbers. Analysts’ consensus estimates for 2021/22 are at present about a tenth below those for the current year. 

B&M has been one of the biggest beneficiaries of harsh UK lockdowns that have left consumers bored, homebound and cash rich. As vaccine rollouts hasten a return to normal, that trade remains exposed.

Deliveroo: bryce.elder@ft.com
B&M: andrew.whiffin@ft.com

City Bulletin

Sign up to the City Bulletin newsletter for the latest company news. Every morning our UK equities reporter Bryce Elder covers the biggest business stories and delivers them straight to your inbox by 8am UK time.



Source link

Continue Reading

Trending